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Child Support Law in Upland, CA

Legal conflicts involving family relationships can be complex and emotionally charged, especially when children are involved. If you’re engaged in a legal battle related to child support in 318 N Mountain Ave Upland, CA 91786, you need representation from an attorney you can trust. Law Office of Stephen Gassner wants to help you reach a successful resolution of your child support case, and will work hard to provide the personalized, attentive service you deserve.

Compassionate Representation

Child-related legal matters can be devastating. That’s why Law Office of Stephen Gassner does everything possible to bring about a positive resolution to your child support case while minimizing stress and hassle. Law Office of Stephen Gassner pledges to handle your case with the utmost professionalism and compassion while working to protect your best interests.

Law Office of Stephen Gassner’s philosophy is that clients come first. So if you’re involved in a child support conflict, Law Office of Stephen Gassner is here to help. Call today to schedule a consultation.

How are Custody issues decided?

No area of family law brings to the courtroom the tension, anxiety, hostility, volatility and raw emotion as child custody and visitation litigation. Rare is the divorce, dissolution or custody determination in which the parties have been able to set aside personal differences to reach the goal of what is best for the children involved. Most parents pay lip service to this ideal, but often cannot reach it in actuality. Most often a judge will take great pains to get parents themselves to come to a mutually acceptable custody agreement if that is possible. A decision made by a stranger is rarely completely acceptable to all if the attempt has not been made in earnest.

The family court systems of the states usually have several layers of counseling, mediation and conciliation mechanisms in place in an effort to bring warring parents together for the purpose of resolving the issue of what it is in the best interests of their children.

What about visitation?

Generally, a court will grant reasonable visitation rights to a parent unless it is shown that the visitation will be detrimental to the best interests of the child. A non-parent can in the discretion of the court also be granted visitation rights if they have an interest in the welfare of the child—this is generally divided into the area of grandparents, step-parents and other non-parents. It should be noted, however, that this is discretionary. The court may also approve visitation plans and restrictions considering factors relevant to the best interests of the child. A Lead Counsel family law lawyer will guide you through the complicated procedure of child visitation issues.

How is the amount of child support determined?

Federal law now requires that the amount of a child support payment be set in accordance with a guideline. Having a guideline is believed to prevent widely different amounts of child support being ordered from courtroom to courtroom. Guidelines provide an objective basis for the determination of the amount of support to be paid. As a result, most states have established formulas that are used to determine the amount of the payment from one parent to the other. Lead Counsel family law lawyers will safeguard your legal rights and fight for what is fair.

What happens to a father who refuses to pay court ordered child support?

It is against the law for any father, presumed or assumed, to not pay court ordered child support to the custodial guardian, regardless of joint custody. Federal laws permit the interception of tax refunds to enforce child support orders, and other methods of enforcement include wage attachments, seizure of property, suspension of a business license and possible drivers license revocation. Most states have separate Child Support Enforcement agencies in place to oversee these efforts. In the event that none of these attempts are entirely successful, the court of law that issued the child support order can hold the father in contempt and, in the absence of a reasonable explanation for the delinquency, impose a jail term.